Host Intrusion Detection

Monitoring your network includes trying to keep the bad guys out. Unfortunately, unless you disconnect your computer and keep it in a locked vault, there’s no real way to ensure that your system is 100% hack proof. So, in addition to securing your network, you need to monitor for intrusions as well. It’s better to be able to catch an intruder early rather than find out after they’ve done a huge amount of damage.

Intrusion detection systems (IDS) are designed to detect possible intrusion attempts. There are a number of different IDS types, but this post concentrates on the Host Intrusion Detection System (HIDS).

My preferred HIDS of choice is Osiris. Osiris uses a client/server architecture, making it one of the more unique HIDS out there. The server stores all of the configurations and databases, and triggers the scanning process. SSL is used between the client and server to ensure communication integrity.

Once a new client is added, the server performs an initial scan. A configuration file is pushed to the client which then scans the computer accordingly, reporting the results back to the server. This first scan is then used as a baseline database for future comparisons.

The host periodically polls the clients and requests scans. The results of those scans are compared to the baseline database and an alert is sent if there are differences. An administrator can then determine if the changes were authorized and take appropriate action. If the changes are ok, Osiris is updated to use the new results as the baseline database. If the changes are suspect, the administrator can look further into them.

Osiris is very configurable. Scanning intervals can be set, allowing you fine-grained control over the time between scans. Multiple administrators can be set up to monitor and accept changes. Emails can be sent for each and every scan, regardless of changes.

The configuration file allows you to pick and choose what files on the client system are to be monitored. Fine-grain control over this allows the administrator to specify whole directories, or individual files. A filtering system can prevent erroneous results to be sent. For instance, some backup systems change the ctime to reflect when the file was last backed up. Without a filter, Osiris would report changes to all of the files each time a backup is run. Setting up a simple filter to ignore ctime on a file allows the administrator to ignore the backup process.

Overall, Osiris is a great tool for monitoring your server. Be prepared, though, monitoring HIDS can get cumbersome, especially with a large number of servers. Every update, change, or new program installed can trigger a HIDS alert.

There are other HIDS packages as well. I have not tested most of these, but they are included for completeness :

  • OSSEC
  • OSSEC is an actively maintained HIDS that supports log analysis, integrity checking, rootkit detection, and more.
  • AFICK
  • AFICK is another actively maintained HIDS that offers both CLI and GUI based operation
  • Samhain
  • Samhain is one of the more popular HIDS that offers a centralized monitoring system similar to that of Osiris.
  • Tripwire
  • Tripwire is a commercial HIDS that allows monitoring of configurations, files, databases and more. Tripwire is quite sophisticated and is mostly intended for large enterprises.
  • Aide
  • Aide is an open-source HIDS that models itself after Tripwire

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