The Patchwork OS

Twelve patches, Twenty Three vulnerabilities.

Tuesday was Microsoft Patch day. Of the twelve patches, nine were for the Windows OS, two for Office, and one for Internet Explorer. A breakdown of the severity of each patch can be found on the ISC Website.

 

I mention this because of the severity of these flaws. There is already an exploit in the wild taking advantage of MS06-040, a flaw in the Server service. This is yet another flaw in the RPC functionality of Windows. Ports 139/tcp and 445/tcp are again the attack vector used to exploit this. For those that remember the past few years, these ports are notorious for being used as vectors to exploit the RPC service. Most commonly associated with Netbios, these are probably the most blocked ports on the Internet.

In addition to the above gem, there are also vulnerabilities in DNS resolution, the Windows Management Console, and more. You can find more information on all of these exploits at the link mentioned above. I highly recommend patching your system ASAP since exploits are in the wild and this could easily turn into another Blaster style attack. Even the Department of Homeland Security is recommending that you patch immediately. According to some reports, Microsoft is already bracing for an attack.

 

I find the frequency and number of exploitable bugs in the Windows OS to be disturbing. Linux and OSX have bugs, but nothing as frequent as Windows seems to have. A lot of the reports that compare the various operating systems seems to miss the fact that Windows as an OS (minus any Office or IE patches) has a higher number of critical exploits as compared to Linux or OSX. Often the exploits of other packages such as apache, ftp, etc are lumped in with the Linux count and assumed to be part of the OS. While most Linux distros ship with much more than the Linux Kernel itself, it’s unfair to count those exploits as part of the whole. Other reports seem to realize these facts and produce results much closer to the truth.

I think, however, that Microsoft has helped the computer industry. They helped popularize the personal computer and provided much of the software for the initial PC boom. They have invested billions of dollars into creating their products and bringing them to market. But, I think it’s high time for them to make some major changes. I would like to see them embrace the Open Source community and learn how to build and market open source products. If they embraced the Linux OS and helped extend it instead of fighting against it, I think the computer industry could take another giant leap forward. They can certainly continue to create and sell the various applications they currently have, and even produce new ones. The very act of running their apps on a Linux system may help to enhance security across the entire industry. Linux itself has proven to be very resilient to attack.

One of the biggest myths about Linux seems to be the belief that all software running on a Linux system has to be open source. Nothing could be further from the truth, however. It is certainly acceptable to run closed source products on an open source OS provided that you play within the rules. I’m not 100% clear on all of the ramifications of the GPL license, but as I understand it, you are permitted to modify any OSS product out there provided you make the source available. But, I believe you are permitted to build closed source apps using OSS libraries and not distribute the source *if* you use unaltered versions of the libraries. I may be wrong here, so please correct me if I am. Regardless, the ability to write closed source programs that run on an OSS platform definitely exists.

 

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