Much Ado About Lion

Apple released the latest version of it’s OS X operating system, Lion, on July 20th. With this release came a myriad of changes in both the UI and back-end systems. Many of these features are denounced by critics as Apple slowly killing off OS X in favor of iOS. After spending some time with Lion, I have to disagree.

Many of the new UI features are very iOS-like, but I’m convinced that this is not a move to dumb down OS X. I believe this is a move by Apple to make the OS work better with the hardware it sells. Hear me out before you declare me a fanboy and move on.

Since the advent of the unibody Macbook, Apple has been shipping buttonless input devices. The Macbook itself has a large touchpad, sans button. Later, they released the magic mouse, sort of a transition device between mice and trackpads. I’m not a fan of that particular device. And finally, they’re shipping the trackpad today. No buttons, lots of room for gestures. Just check out the copy direct from their website.

If you look at a lot of the changes made in Lion, they go hand-in-hand with new gestures. Natural scrolling allows you to move the screen in the same direction your fingers are moving. Swipe three fingers to the left and right, the desktop you’re on moves along with it. Explode your fingers outwards and Launchpad appears, a quick, simple way to access your applications folder. Similar gestures are available for the Magic Mouse as well.

These gestures allow for quick and simple access to many of the more advanced features of Lion. Sure, iOS had some of these features first, but just because they’ve moved to another platform doesn’t mean that the platforms are merging.

Another really interesting feature in Lion is one that has been around for a while in iOS. When Apple first designed iOS, they likely realized that standard scrollbars chew up a significant amount of screen real estate. Sure, on a regular computer it may be a relatively small percentage, but on a small screen like a phone, it’s significant. So, they designed a thinner scrollbar, minus the arrows normally seen at the top and bottom, and made it auto-hide when the screen isn’t being scrolled. This saved a lot of room on the screen.

Apple has taken the scrollbar feature and integrated it into the desktop OS. And the effect is pretty significant. The amount of room saved on-screen is quite noticeable. I have seen a few complaints about this new feature, however, mostly complaining that it’s difficult to grab the scrollbar with the mouse pointer, or that the arrow buttons are gone. I think the former is just a general “they changed something” complaint while the latter is truly legitimate. There have been a few situations where I’ve looked for the arrow buttons and their absence was noticeable., I wonder, however, whether this is a function of habit, or if their use is truly necessary. I’ve been able to work around this pretty easily on my Macbook, but after I install Lion on my Mac Pro, I expect that I’ll have a slightly harder time. Unless, that is, I buy a trackpad. As I said, I believe Apple has built this new OS with their newer input devices in mind.

On the back end, Lion is, from what I can tell, completely 64-bit. They have removed Java and Flash, and, interestingly, banned both from their online App Store. No apps that require Java or Flash can be sold there. Interesting move. Additionally, Rosetta, the emulation software that allows older PowerPC software to run, has been removed as well.

Overall, I’m enjoying my Lion experience. I still have the power of a unix-based system with the simplicity of a well thought out GUI interface. I can still do all of the programming I’m used to as well as watch videos, listen to music, and play games. I think I’ll still keep a traditional multi-button mouse around for gaming, though.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.