Evaluating a Blogging Platform

I’ve been pondering my choices lately, determining if I should stay with my current blogging platform or move to another one. There’s nothing immediate forcing me to change, nor is there anything overly compelling to the platform I’m currently using. This is an exercise I seem to go through from time to time. It’s probably for the better as it keeps me abreast of what else is out there and allows me to re-evaluate choices I’ve made in the past.

So, what is out there? Well, Serendipity has grown quite a bit as a blogging platform and is quite well supported. That, in its own right, makes it a worthy choice. The plugin support is quite vast and the API is simple enough that creating new plugins when the need arises is a quick task.

There are some drawbacks, however. Since it’s not quite as popular as some other platforms, interoperability with some things is difficult. For instance, the offline blogging tool I’m using right now, BlogPress, doesn’t work quite right with Serendipity. I believe this might be due to missing features and/or bugs in the Serendipity XMLRPC interface. Fortunately, someone in the community had already debugged the problem and provided a fix.

WordPress is probably one of the more popular platforms right now. Starting a WordPress blog can be as simple as creating a new account at wordpress.com. There’s also the option of downloading the WordPress distribution and hosting it on your own. As with Serendipity, WordPress also has a vibrant community and a significant plugin collection. From what I understand, WordPress also has the ability to be used as a static website, though that’s less of an interest for me. WordPress has wide support in a number of offline blogging tools, including custom applications for iPad and iPhone devices.

There are a number of “cloud” platforms as well. Examples include Tumblr, Live Journal, and Blogger. These platforms have a wide variety of interoperability with services such as Twitter and Flickr, but you sacrifice control. You are at the complete mercy of the platform provider with very little alternative. For instance, if a provider disagrees with you, they can easily block or delete your content. Or, the provider can go out of business, leaving you without access to your blog at all. These, in my book, are significant drawbacks.

Another possible choice is Drupal. I’ve been playing around with Drupal quite a bit, especially since it’s the platform of choice for a lot of projects I’ve been involved with lately. It seems to fit the bill pretty well and is incredibly extensible. In fact, it’s probably the closest I’ve come to actually making a switch up to this point. The one major hurdle I have at the moment is lack of API support for blogging tools. Yes, I’m aware of the BlogAPI module, but according to the project page for it, it’s incomplete, unsupported, and the author isn’t working on it anymore. While I was able to install it and initially connect to the Drupal site, it doesn’t seem that any of the posting functionality works at this time. Drupal remains the strongest competitor at this point and has a real chance of becoming my new platform of choice.

For the time being, however, I’m content with Serendipity. The community remains strong, there’s a new release on the horizon, and, most important, it just works.

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